Pump Fake: LaMarcus Aldridge Suddenly Retires and Shocks the NBA World

On Thursday morning, LaMarcus Aldridge announced that he was retiring from the NBA due to an irregular heartbeat. Aldridge wrote that he experienced the condition during his final appearance with the team against the Lakers. He went on to explain that his condition worsened the next morning and he alerted to team. The Nets immediately sent Aldridge to the hospital and he called the experience, “one of the scariest things I've experienced.” Brooklyn sat Aldridge for two games for a “non-Covid 19 illness.” Soon after, Aldridge announced his retirement stating that “For 15 years, I've put basketball first, and now, it is time to put my health and family first." In 2007, LaMarcus Aldridge was diagnosed with Wolf-Parkinson-White Syndrome which affects the two chambers of his heart. The center has spent time away from basketball for other health concerns, but he is now permanently retiring.

LaMarcus Aldridge was drafted second overall by the Chicago Bulls in the 2006 NBA draft and had his rights traded to the Portland Trail Blazers. Aldridge spent nine seasons with the Trail Blazers and after he announced his retirement the Trail Blazers released a statement saying, “LaMarcus had a storied NBA career, and his time as a Trail Blazer will always be remembered fondly. Any success we experienced during his tenure in Portland would not have been possible without his work ethic, dedication and talent.” Aldridge will undoubtedly go down as one of the best Trail Blazers ever. After his tenure with the Blazers, Aldrige went on to play with the San Antonio Spurs, where he played 5.5 seasons under Greg Popovich. The Spurs head coach released a statement saying that Aldrige is a "consummate professional with a unique skillset and a deep respect for the game.'' Aldridge was bought out by the Spurs then signed with the Brooklyn Nets this season. This situation parallels when Chris Bosh was forced to prematurely retire because of blood clots. It is never an easy situation to witness, but it is nice to see players place their health above the game, so their situations do not worsen.


Email Ryan at rrm232@cornell.edu with any questions