Events from the Cornell English Dept.

Reading by Jenny Xie Thursday, September 19, 4:30 p.m. Hollis E. Cornell Auditorium, 132 Goldwin Smith Hall

The Fall 2019 Barbara & David Zalaznick Creative Writing Reading Series kicks off with a reading by acclaimed Chinese American poet and National Book Award finalist Jenny Xie.

Jenny Xie was born in Hefei, China, and raised in New Jersey. She is the author of Eye Level, which was selected by Juan Felipe Herrera for the Walt Whitman Award of the Academy of American Poets. Eye Level also received the Holmes National Poetry Prize from Princeton University, was named a finalist for the National Book Award and a PEN Open Book Award, and was longlisted for the Dylan Thomas Prize. Her chapbook, Nowhere to Arrive, won the Drinking Gourd Prize. Xie holds degrees from Princeton University and NYU, and has received grants and support from Kundiman, the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, the Elizabeth George Foundation, and Poets & Writers. Her work appears in POETRYThe New York Times Magazine, and Tin House, among other publications. She has taught creative writing at NYU and Princeton University, and currently lives in New York.

Reception and book signing to follow in the English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall

Free and open to the public

For more information about the Zalaznick Reading Series, visit english.cornell.edu/zalaznick, email creativewriting@cornell.edu or call 607.255.7847.

The venues are wheelchair accessible and equipped with assistive listening technology. If you need accommodations to participate in these events, please contact us as soon as possible.

Worried about parking? TCAT bus route 10 Commons-Cornell loop leaves Seneca Street station every 12 minutes on Thursday afternoons until 6:16p.m. and stops outside Klarman/Goldwin Smith Halls. After 6:16p.m., Route 10 runs every 24 minutes. Last trip from campus to downtown is at 7:28p.m. The cash fare for a single ride is $1.50.

This event is presented by the Department of English / Creative Writing Program at Cornell University

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MorganFest: A Robert Morgan Celebration Thursday, October 3, 8:30 a.m. - 6:30 p.m.

*Silver Birch Suite, Statler Hall (5th floor)

*unless otherwise noted

Cornell University’s Department of English is planning a major celebration to honor Robert Morgan. The event will include panels, a conversation, a reading, and other tributes to one of Cornell’s most beloved professors. An award-winning poet, fiction writer, novelist, historian and biographer and scholar, Morgan remains an inspiring teacher and beloved colleague. Please join us in celebrating his remarkable achievements and profound influence in American Letters.

8:30 a.m. - Coffee and Bagels

9:00 a.m. - Welcome Remarks

9:30 a.m. - On Morgan’s Poetics Panel featuring: Bhisham Bherwani (Independent scholar & writer) Jesse Graves (East Tennessee State University) John Lang (Emory & Henry College (emeritus)) Robert West (Mississippi State University)

11:00 a.m. - Coffee Break

11:30 a.m. - On Morgan’s Prose Panel featuring: Nicole Drewitz-Crockett (Emory & Henry College) Martha Greene Eads (Eastern Mennonite University) Rebecca Godwin (Barton College) Randall Wilhelm (Anderson University)

12:45 p.m. - Lunch Provided

1:45 p.m. - A Conversation with Robert Morgan Featuring: Alice Fulton (Cornell University) Randall Kenan (UNC English & Comparative Literature) Kenneth McClane (Cornell University)

4:30 p.m. - MorganFest Reading *Rhodes-Rawlings Auditorium, G70 Klarman Hall

The Fall 2019 Barbara & David Zalaznick Creative Writing Reading Series continues with this celebration in honor of poet, novelist, and professor Robert Morgan. Morgan and three of his former students will read from their own works:

Robert Morgan, Poet & Novelist Robert Morgan was born on October 3, 1944 in Hendersonville, North Carolina, near the Blue Ridge Mountains. His early studies included music, science, and engineering, but writing proved to be his truest passion. His first published books were collections of poems, earthy in sensibility and grounded in the rhythms of work. Though he continues to write poetry, Morgan has devoted much of his creative energy to short stories and novels that draw on the rich history of Appalachia, including the bestseller Gap Creek (1999) and Chasing the North Star (2016). Most recently Morgan has turned to biography, on subjects ranging from Daniel Boone to Edgar Allan Poe. Since 1971 he has taught at Cornell University, where he is now the Kappa Alpha Professor of English and much loved as a writer, poet, colleague, and mentor.

Elizabeth Holmes MFA '87, Poet Elizabeth Holmes is the author of three books of poetry, most recently Passing Worlds: Tahiti in the Era of Captain Cook (LSU Press, 2018). She lives in Ithaca, New York, and works as a writer at Cornell University.

Lynn Powell MFA '80, Poet & Nonfiction Writer Lynn Powell has published three books of poetry, including Season of the Second Thought, and a nonfiction book, Framing Innocence. Her honors include an NEA Fellowship, the Brittingham and the Felix Pollak Prizes in poetry, and the Studs & Ida Terkel Award for nonfiction. She teaches at Oberlin College.

Robert Schultz MFA '76, MA '78, PhD '81, Author & Artist Robert Schultz’s work includes three poetry collections, a novel, a nonfiction work, and an art book. He has received an NEA Award, The Virginia Quarterly Review’s Balch Prize, and Cornell’s Corson Bishop Poetry Prize. Schultz’s artwork is held by the U.S. Library of Congress, the University of Virginia, and private collectors.

6:15 p.m. - Reception and Book Signing *English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall

Free and open to the public

For more information, visit english.cornell.edu/english-events, email creativewriting@cornell.edu or call 607.255.7847.

The venues are wheelchair accessible and equipped with assistive listening technology. If you need accommodations to participate in these events, please contact us as soon as possible.

Worried about parking? TCAT bus route 10 Commons-Cornell loop leaves Seneca Street station every 12 minutes on Thursday afternoons until 6:16p.m. and stops outside Klarman/Goldwin Smith Halls. After 6:16p.m., Route 10 runs every 24 minutes. Last trip from campus to downtown is at 7:28p.m. The cash fare for a single ride is $1.50.

This event is presented by the Department of English / Creative Writing Program at Cornell University

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MorganFest Reading Thursday, October 3, 4:30 p.m. Rhodes-Rawlings Auditorium, G70 Klarman Hall This reading is the culmination of a full-day celebration; see full MorganFest schedule on the Cornell Dept. of English events page.

Featuring:

Robert Morgan, Poet & Novelist Robert Morgan was born on October 3, 1944 in Hendersonville, North Carolina, near the Blue Ridge Mountains. His early studies included music, science, and engineering, but writing proved to be his truest passion. His first published books were collections of poems, earthy in sensibility and grounded in the rhythms of work. Though he continues to write poetry, Morgan has devoted much of his creative energy to short stories and novels that draw on the rich history of Appalachia, including the bestseller Gap Creek (1999) and Chasing the North Star (2016). Most recently Morgan has turned to biography, on subjects ranging from Daniel Boone to Edgar Allan Poe. Since 1971 he has taught at Cornell University, where he is now the Kappa Alpha Professor of English and much loved as a writer, poet, colleague, and mentor.

In honor of Morgan, three of his former students will read from their own works:

Elizabeth Holmes MFA '87, Poet Elizabeth Holmes is the author of three books of poetry, most recently Passing Worlds: Tahiti in the Era of Captain Cook (LSU Press, 2018). She lives in Ithaca, New York, and works as a writer at Cornell University.

Lynn Powell MFA '80, Poet & Nonfiction Writer Lynn Powell has published three books of poetry, including Season of the Second Thought, and a nonfiction book, Framing Innocence. Her honors include an NEA Fellowship, the Brittingham and the Felix Pollak Prizes in poetry, and the Studs & Ida Terkel Award for nonfiction. She teaches at Oberlin College.

Robert Schultz MFA '76, MA '78, PhD '81, Author & Artist Robert Schultz’s work includes three poetry collections, a novel, a nonfiction work, and an art book. He has received an NEA Award, The Virginia Quarterly Review’s Balch Prize, and Cornell’s Corson Bishop Poetry Prize. Schultz’s artwork is held by the U.S. Library of Congress, the University of Virginia, and private collectors.

Reception and book signing to follow in the English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall

Free and open to the public

For more information about the Zalaznick Reading Series, visit english.cornell.edu/zalaznick, email creativewriting@cornell.edu or call 607.255.7847.

The venues are wheelchair accessible and equipped with assistive listening technology. If you need accommodations to participate in these events, please contact us as soon as possible.

Worried about parking? TCAT bus route 10 Commons-Cornell loop leaves Seneca Street station every 12 minutes on Thursday afternoons until 6:16p.m. and stops outside Klarman/Goldwin Smith Halls. After 6:16p.m., Route 10 runs every 24 minutes. Last trip from campus to downtown is at 7:28p.m. The cash fare for a single ride is $1.50.

This event is presented by the Department of English / Creative Writing Program at Cornell University

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Reading by Desiree Cooper Thursday, October 24, 4:30 p.m. Rhodes-Rawlings Auditorium, G70 Klarman Hall

The Fall 2019 Barbara & David Zalaznick Creative Writing Reading Series comes to a close with a reading by Pulitzer Prize-nominated Journalist & Women's Rights Activist Desiree Cooper.

Desiree Cooper is a 2015 Kresge Artist Fellow, former attorney and Pulitzer Prize-nominated journalist. Her debut collection of flash fiction, Know the Mother, has won numerous awards including 2017 Next Generation Indie Book Award. Cooper’s fiction, poetry and essays have appeared in The Best Small Fictions 2018CallalooMichigan Quarterly ReviewHypertext Review, and Best African American Fiction 2010, among other publications. In 2018, she wrote, produced and co-directed “The Choice,” a short film about reproductive rights and recipient of the 2019 Berlin Flash Film Festival’s Outstanding Achievement Award, and an Award of Merit from the Los Angeles Best Short Film Festival. Cooper was a founding board member of Cave Canem, a national residency for black poets.

Reception and book signing to follow in the English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall

Free and open to the public

For more information about the Zalaznick Reading Series, visit english.cornell.edu/zalaznick, email creativewriting@cornell.edu or call 607.255.7847.

The venues are wheelchair accessible and equipped with assistive listening technology. If you need accommodations to participate in these events, please contact us as soon as possible.

Worried about parking? TCAT bus route 10 Commons-Cornell loop leaves Seneca Street station every 12 minutes on Thursday afternoons until 6:16p.m. and stops outside Klarman/Goldwin Smith Halls. After 6:16p.m., Route 10 runs every 24 minutes. Last trip from campus to downtown is at 7:28p.m. The cash fare for a single ride is $1.50.

This event is presented by the Department of English / Creative Writing Program at Cornell University

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The Philip Freund Prize for Creative Writing Alumni Reading by Dorothy Chan, Nicholas Friedman, Ruth Joffre, & Daniel Peña Thursday, November 14, 4:30 p.m. Hollis E. Cornell Auditorium, 132 Goldwin Smith Hall

Recipients of the 2019 Philip Freund Prize in Creative Writing for excellence in publication will read from their works:

Dorothy Chan BA ‘12, Poet Dorothy Chan is the author of Revenge of the Asian WomanAttack of the Fifty-Foot Centerfold, and the chapbook Chinatown Sonnets. She was a 2014 finalist for the Ruth Lilly and Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Poetry Fellowship. Chan is the Poetry Editor of Hobart and an Assistant Professor of Creative Writing at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire. Visit her website at dorothypoetry.com.

Nicholas Friedman MFA ’12, Poet Nicholas Friedman is the author of Petty Theft, winner of The New Criterion Poetry Prize. His poems have appeared in the New York TimesPOETRYYale Review, and other venues. A former Wallace Stegner Fellow, he is also the recipient of a Ruth Lilly Fellowship from the Poetry Foundation. He lives with his wife and son in Syracuse.

Ruth Joffre BA ‘11, Author Ruth Joffre is the author of the story collection Night Beast. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in Kenyon ReviewGulf CoastPrairie SchoonerLightspeedThe Masters ReviewNashville ReviewCutBank, and elsewhere. She lives in Seattle and teaches at the Hugo House.

Daniel Peña MFA ‘12, Novelist Daniel Peña is a Pushcart Prize-winning writer and Assistant Professor in the Department of English at the University of Houston-Downtown. A Fulbright-Garcia Robles Scholar and former Picador Guest Professor in Leipzig, Germany, his writing has appeared in PloughsharesThe GuardianKenyon Review, and NBC News among other outlets. His novel, Bang, is out now from Arte Publico Press.

Philip Freund ’29, MA ’32, was a novelist, short-story writer, poet, documentary film writer, playwright, television dramatist, essayist, and literary critic. The Philip Freund Prize for Creative Writing honors graduates upon their successful publication.

Reception and book signing to follow in the English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall

Free and open to the public

For more information, visit english.cornell.edu/english-events, email creativewriting@cornell.edu or call 607.255.7847.

The venues are wheelchair accessible and equipped with assistive listening technology. If you need accommodations to participate in these events, please contact us as soon as possible.

Worried about parking? TCAT bus route 10 Commons-Cornell loop leaves Seneca Street station every 12 minutes on Thursday afternoons until 6:16p.m. and stops outside Klarman/Goldwin Smith Halls. After 6:16p.m., Route 10 runs every 24 minutes. Last trip from campus to downtown is at 7:28p.m. The cash fare for a single ride is $1.50.

This event is presented by the Department of English / Creative Writing Program at Cornell University

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The Paul Gottschalk Memorial Lecture by Richard Rambuss “Milton, Spenser, Shakespeare, and Carnival—New Orleans Style” Thursday, November 21, 4:30 p.m. Guerlac Room, A.D. White House

Literature may be far from mind now when one thinks of what’s billed as the greatest bacchanal in the US: Mardi Gras in New Orleans. Yet a learned deployment of English literature—especially Renaissance literature—played a structuring role in a denotatively Anglo-American endeavor to appropriate and “elevate” Carnival traditions in multicultural New Orleans. This lecture focuses on the all-male, secret society Carnival organizations founded in the mid- to late-nineteenth century, beginning with the Mystick Krewe of Comus (named after Milton’s masque), which innovated the elaborate, expensive public parades and private tableaux balls for which New Orleans Carnival has come to be known. The themes for their fanciful, erudite Mardi Gras pageantry were often derived from poetry and drama. This lecture reflects upon the performative afterlife of English Renaissance literature in an American context. But it does so outside the usual Northeastern purview to consider Milton, Spenser, and Shakespeare in the Deep South—in New Orleans, which (as Robert D. Abrahams puts it) “has provided alternative ways of thinking about almost everything in American life.”

Richard Rambuss is chair of the English Department at Brown University, where he is Nicholas Brown Professor of Oratory and Belles Lettres. His teaching and writing travels back and forth between early modern literature and contemporary culture, especially film. Much of his interest in the old and the new turns on questions of gender and sexuality. He has published three books, most recently The English Poems of Richard Crashaw, the first new scholarly edition of this ecstatic seventeenth-century poet in fifty years. He has also just completed a manuscript on men and masculinity in extreme circumstances in the work of Stanley Kubrick, which is forthcoming from Fordham University Press. He is now working on a new book titled Mardi Gras Milton: The Golden Age of New Orleans Carnival and English Renaissance Literature.

The Gottschalk Memorial Lecture was established in memory of Paul Gottschalk, Professor of English at Cornell, scholar of British Renaissance literature and author of "The Meanings of Hamlet" (1972). He died in 1977 at the age of 38.

Reception to follow in the A.D. White House

Free and open to the public

For more information, visit english.cornell.edu/english-events, email creativewriting@cornell.edu or call 607.255.7847.

The venues are wheelchair accessible and equipped with assistive listening technology. If you need accommodations to participate in these events, please contact us as soon as possible.

Worried about parking? TCAT bus route 10 Commons-Cornell loop leaves Seneca Street station every 12 minutes on Thursday afternoons until 6:16p.m. and stops outside Klarman/Goldwin Smith Halls. After 6:16p.m., Route 10 runs every 24 minutes. Last trip from campus to downtown is at 7:28p.m. The cash fare for a single ride is $1.50.

This event is presented by the Department of English / Creative Writing Program at Cornell University

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